November 14 - November 20, 2005
THE ILOCOS TIMES - FEATURE

Atty. Emmanuel Samonte Tipon
Contributor


Immigration guide
What is the measure of one’s love?

“I love you,” declared The Flying Dutchman (James Mason) to Pandora (Ava Gardner) in the film “Pandora and the Flying Dutchman”.

“The measure of one’s love is what one is willing to give up for it,” said Pandora.

“What are you willing to give up for it?” Pandora asked.

“My salvation,” replied The Flying Dutchman.

So, Mr. or Madam petitioner or would-be petitioner, what are you willing to give up to show your love for your loved ones?

Remember, your loved ones are not asking you to give up your salvation.

They are only asking you to save them from a life of hopelessness and helplessness abroad.

If you help your loved ones, it might help you in attaining your own salvation.

Didn’t Jesus reportedly say: “He who loves the least of my brethren loves me.”

If you don’t believe in Jesus or if your answer to the question “What are you willing to give up for love?” is “Nothing,” then read no further.

What are you willing to do?

If you are still reading this, then ask yourself:

1. Are you willing to spend time, effort, and a little money to seek counsel from a lawyer (rather than immigration ignoramuses) on how to properly petition for your loved ones?

2. Are you willing to spend time and effort to fill up the petition forms and prepare the various supporting documents required to petition your loved ones?

3. Are you willing to spend money to pay the various fees required to petition your loved ones?

4. Are you willing to spend money to pay for a preliminary medical examination of your loved ones by a private doctor to be sure that they will be able to pass the consular medical examination?

5. Are you willing to spend time, effort, and money to travel to the Philippines to help prepare your loved ones for, and be with them at, the interview?

If you are willing to do all of these, then you are on the way to your own salvation.

Who are petitionable relatives?

Here are the loved ones whom you can petition for so that they can come to paradise and enjoy a better life.

U.S. citizens can petition:
(1) Husband or wife.
(2) Unmarried children under 21 years old.
(3) Unmarried son or daughter over 21 years old.
(4) Married son or daughter of any age.
(5) Parent, if petitioner is at least 21 years old.
(6) Brother or sister, if petitioner is at least 21 years old.
(7) Fiancé or fiancée (person with whom petitioner is engaged to be married).

Lawful permanent residents (Green card holder) can petition:
(1) Husband or wife
(2) Unmarried child under 21 years of age.
(3) Unmarried son or daughter over 21 years of age.
The above are the only petitionable relatives as of today.

Please don’t ask silly questions as to whether you can petition other relatives not in the list, such as your mother-in-law.

(Atty. Emmanuel S. Tipon has a Master of Laws degree from Yale Law School and a Bachelor of Laws degree from the University of the Philippines. He served as an Immigration Officer. Offices at 905 Umi St. corner N King, Suite 201, Honolulu, HI 96819. Fax (808) 847 1624. Hawaii Tel. (808) 847 160. California Tel. (510) 825 1045. E-Mail: filamlaw@yahoo.com. Website: www.ImmigrationServicesUSA.com. Listen to Hawaii KNDI Radio, Dial AM 1270 Every Friday 7-9 a.m.)

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